Kodak

Left: Kodak album from the collection (photo: Hege Oulie/Preus museum) Right: The Kodak camera (photo: Helle K. Hagen/Preus museum)

Kodak album

Page from a Kodak album in the collection (photo: Hege Oulie/Preus museum)

The Kodak Camera

The Kodak Camera (Photo: Helle K. Hagen / Preus museum)

Kodak

"You press the button, we do the rest!"

The Kodak camera, with film on roll, represented a revolutionary change in photography. The slogan "You press the button, we do the rest", explains why this camera was the start of an explosion of memory photographs. It became very easy to take pictures, and there was no stress with the developing process. Albums with pockets inside where the photographs could fit right was also produced.

But there was a catch, exposures were round, although the paper was square!

Kodak album

Round formats!

Taking good pictures is not easy when the format is round, that's easy to see in this Kodak album. The album belonged to an Englishman, who was photographing during a holiday in 1894. He collected the photographs he took in this memory album. He has both drawn and written information to the images on the sides so that we subsequently know where they are taken.

The pictures themselves do not tell us much. They are pictures taken on his trip from Lands End, corresponding to our World's End, to London. The small town of Newlyn is completely on the south tip of Britain. The photographer has taken pictures of people, street parties and backyards in town. In addition, he photographed the local pub, "Mousehole".

The Kodak Camera

This little anonymous box was the start of a large company and a beloved hobby for millions of people. The World also got a new word; Kodak.

George Eastman started his career by industrial production of dry plates; glass negatives with photosensitive gelatin emulsion. He further developed this into a roll film. The camera was easy to operate and the factory was responsible for the developing.

The company's motto was "You press the button, we do the rest". The images were round with a diameter of 2 ½ ".

Source: Todd Gustavson, 500 Cameras, Brian Coe Kodak Cameras

Left: Kodak album from the collection (photo: Hege Oulie/Preus museum) Right: The Kodak camera (photo: Helle K. Hagen/Preus museum)

Page from a Kodak album in the collection (photo: Hege Oulie/Preus museum)

The Kodak Camera (Photo: Helle K. Hagen / Preus museum)